Mar 252016
 

So after losing a tire on my second run out this season, I decided to change out my stock Bontrager tires for some slicks.  Since I’m usually riding on local roads or the rail trail anyway, I figured why not.  I picked up a pair of thorn resistant inner tubes, and a pair of Continental City Ride II tires.  The tires were much easier to mount than I expected.  At first I was put off by the whitewall strip on the side of the tires – I think black tires look so much better!  However, the strip on these tires is highly reflective, and since I do the bulk of my “get less fat” riding at night, these are well suited for making sure all the local drunks and tourists can see me at night.  Have a look here:

BRIGHTNESS

The reflective strip illuminated by the flash on my iPhone.

The first thing I noticed on my first ride with these tires was just how quiet they were.  Some of the Amazon reviewers complained that the tires didn’t roll quite so nice as some other tires and that you might notice reduced speed, but I’m too far out of shape to make that determination at this point. (Like REAL bad..LOL)  I figure a few months down the road, I’ll be better able to compare the performance of these tires against the stock tires on longer rides.  This time out, I was off my usual time by 50%…yikes!

RIDEFATBOYRIDE

And you know the 20.8mi/h was downhill, right?

Sep 062015
 

So after a few trips down the rail trail and back I decided that I didn’t really want to trust A-GPS from my iPhone 5S to deliver accurate speed and distance information to Cyclemeter.   After all, if I’m going to ride forty-odd miles and then analyze the ride data later, shouldn’t it be accurate?  So I needed a speed sensor.

Cyclemeter is compatible with a wide range of devices.  Given my application, I decided to pick up a Blue SC from Wahoo Fitness.  This tracker will not only do speed, but also cadence.  Initially cadence wasn’t important to me, but after reviewing ride data for a few short runs, I’ve found it to be useful in improving my pace in a few spots that have rough asphalt or hills. 

The Wahoo Blue SC includes the main unit, a magnet to attach to a spoke for the speed sensor, and a magnet that slips onto the crank to measure cadence. 

Wahoo Fitness Blue SC

 The devices look something like this when installed: 

Lower red arrow is cadence magnet

 Here it is on my bike: 

 Unfortunately the magnet on the crank is pretty easy to kick off the bike apparently.  Mine seems to have gone missing at about the 12 mile mark: 

Lost the crank magnet!

 I’ll have to contact Wahoo Fitness for a replacement, but in the meanwhile, I’ve got a magnet pulled out of an old hard disk affixed to the back side of the crank.  In a very brief test, it seemed to deliver the desired result.  This is a lot less bulky than the magnet that came with it, so if I’m lucky, it won’t go flying off at speed. 

Hope it stays on!

 I’ll have to let you know!